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The Miró Quartet: Live & Virtual
Performance Event on
28 September at 8:00pm

Internet2 Demos for Fall 2004


The following advanced networking applications demonstrations will be featured at the the Fall 2004 Internet2 Member Meeting, which will be held at the Hilton Austin hotel in Austin, Texas. The demos will be in Salon K and take place Tuesday, September 28, 1:00-5:00pm and Wednesday, September 29, 10:00am-5:00pm.

Logistics for Demoers

If you have any questions, please contact Elaine Lauerman <ekl@internet2.edu> or call (734) 913-4253.


[Archive of Demos from Earlier Internet2 Events]


Collaborative Visualization and Segmentation of Volumetric Data Sets using an Immersive, Haptically-Enabled Environment

http://havnet.stanford.edu
http://visu.uwlax.edu/NGI/NGI.html

Developed by:
Stanford University
University of Wisconsin–La Crosse

Demonstrators:
Parvati Dev
Steven Senger

Contacts:
Parvati Dev
parvati@stanford.edu
(650) 723-8087

Steven Senger
senger@cs.uwlax.edu
(608) 785-8387

Funded by:
National Library of Medicine
National Science Foundation

Description:
This demonstration will provide participants with a hands-on opportunity to work with the Immersive Segmentation application. This application, which is a part of the Stanford HAVnet Project, allows remotely separated users to collaboratively work at visualizing and segmenting structures in volumetric data sets such as the Visible Human. The client interface is stereoscopically immersive and uses a PHANTOM haptic device to both track the user's position and provide force feedback for anatomical structures as they are segmented and visualized. The system provides the user with the ability to interactively direct the application of high-cost segmentation algorithms. Several segmentation techniques are available to the user including the ability to interactively generate surface mesh representations of segmented structures. Haptic feedback not only provides the user with a sense of touch for the segmented anatomical structures, but is also used to control the progress of the segmentation algorithms themselves. The server supports multiple clients with the visualization data stream transported either by unicast udp or multicast. In addition to the visualization data stream, the server also computes and transports a data stream to the client that is used for constructing haptic feedback.

Role of Internet2:
By virtue of its tightly-coupled interaction between multiple users and remote computation through multiple data streams, this application requires the predictable bandwidth and latency characteristics of Internet2 advanced networks.


Detailed Network Traffic Analysis and Proactive Protection Against Zero-Day Threats

http://www.arbor.net/solutions_universities.php
http://www.arbor.net/products_sp.php

Developed by:
Arbor Networks

Demonstrators:
Ron Majer
Carlos Morales

Contact:
Lisa Quinby
lquinby@arbor.net
(781) 768-3294

Description:
Peakflow SP provides a comprehensive solution delivering powerful network traffic analysis and secure, reliable communications across the entire network. Peakflow SP's Traffic and Routing module transforms network operations through its complete view of network-wide traffic and routing data. With real-time visibility into all parts of the network, network operators can produce detailed usage reports by department, noting allowance for bill back and providing for accurate resource planning. Peakflow SP's Infrastructure Security module proactively detects and mitigates network-wide anomalies such as distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks and zero-day worms. This provides network operators with the information they need to quickly resolve these threats before their network is affected, service suffers, or customers complain.

Role of Internet2:
The development and initial proving ground for Arbor Network's Peakflow solution was founded on a three-year collaborative research effort with Internet2 affiliate member and Abilene connector Merit Network, Inc. and Internet2 member University of Michigan. Over time, Peakflow has been deployed across a number of Internet2 member networks, in the Abilene Network, and at several other leading universities. Arbor Network's successful collaboration as an Internet2 corporate sponsor has strengthened the community's ongoing efforts to improve security.


DREAMS: Disaster Relief Emergency Medical Services

http://www.DREAMS-project.org

Developed by:
Texas A&M University
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Demonstrator:
Larry Flournoy

Contact:
Larry Flournoy
flournoy@isc.tamu.edu
(979) 229-2462

Funded by:
US Army Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC)

Description:
The DREAMS™ project integrates intelligent communication devices in ground-based ambulance services in rural Texas that allow trauma and other medical specialists to treat patients more quickly by providing a “virtual” presence of a physician on the battlefield or at the emergency scene. The goal of these ambulance systems is to improve the diagnosis and treatment of critically injured people in the field by expediting their access to medical experts at trauma centers through the utilization of various modern communication and monitoring devices.

With the expert guidance of the online physician, the presence of a virtual physician has an immediate positive impact on patient care. The DREAMS project demonstrates that the application of telecommunication and other advanced technologies will decrease the interval between the incident of injury and the initiation of definitive tertiary care. Advanced telecommunication technologies will also permit the direction of appropriate interventions that would otherwise be delayed until the patient reaches the treating facility.

In conventional warfare, hemorrhage is the leading cause of death following the occurrence of an injury. By transmitting real-time physiologic data and video display from the battlefield to a medical control center for physician interpretation, the opportunity for initiating appropriate lifesaving procedures and definitive therapies in a timely manner can significantly impact patient survival. With the application of telecommunication technology, new protocols can be developed that will further advance the improved outcome for various specific traumatic injuries. The real-world trauma environment in Houston, Texas, provides the military with the ideal testbed for developing and perfecting procedures to support missions of disaster relief, both domestically and abroad.

We will be demonstrating four of the DREAMS components: Civilian Ambulance, Military Ambulance (HMMWV), Ku band "Mobile" terminal, and Deployable Telemedicine System (DTS).

  • The civilian ambulance is equipped with multiple computers, cameras, and various medical equipment. Electronic health records, patient data bases, video and other data compression, and EMT support databases are available. Multiple wireless and wired LANs as well as 8 cell phones operating in parallel provide connectivity.  The vehicle can also have the Ku band satellite terminal mounted on board.
  • The HMMWV has a subset of the civilian equipment integrated into a full mil-spec four litter, armored vehicle.  Military radios are supported but will not be present.
  • The satellite terminal test vehicle is a standard civilian ambulance with DREAMS upgrades which is used to do only satellite performance testing in parallel with human subjects field testing on the other vehicles.
  • The DTS is the DREAMS software and hardware package from the ambulance redesigned and repackaged to be portable/transportable for drop-in or carry-in to a disaster scene. It can be used as a triage focus or aid station, among other uses.

Role of Internet2:
Internet2 advanced networks have the potential to increase DREAMS capabilities in emergency situations, especially where natural or other large-scale disasters disrupt communications in a region.  A large majority of the nation's medical teaching and research facilities are now connected to Internet2 advanced networks.  Real time large scale or national emergency medical information could be delivered to any or all of these institutions much faster and more effectively over Internet2 than via the commodity Internet.  The DREAMS mobile terminal can be configured to do this on the move.


A Haptic Audio/Visual-Enabled Interaction Across the Pacific

http://havnet.stanford.edu/
http://www.csiro.au/

Developed by:
Commonwealth Scientific & Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Australia
Stanford University

Demonstrators:
Parvati Dev
Robert Cheng
Chris Gunn
Duncan Stevenson
Patricia Youngblood

Contact:
Parvati Dev
parvati@stanford.edu
(650) 723-8087

Funded by:
National Library of Medicine
CSIRO

Description:
This demonstration will use the scenario of a surgical instructor, located remotely in Canberra, Australia, teaching a surgical trainee or student, located at the Internet2 Member Meeting, about a particular surgical procedure.  Delegates at the Internet2 demonstration location will be able to interact with the remote instructor manipulating and feeling the models that are being used as part of the teaching. Others may choose to observe in the style of an audience watching a surgical master-class.  The concepts being explored will include:

  • The student and instructor engaged in a dialogue, both with words and with actions, mediated by virtual tools, objects and interaction interfaces
  • The audience observing the dialogue and the subjects of the dialogue
  • The geographical distance between instructor and student/audience (actually approximately 8,500 miles) as no barrier to successful interaction

The surgical instructor will lead the student through the simulated procedure, while immersed in the 3D scene comprising liver, stomach, gall bladder, kidneys, and other abdominal organs.  The system will continuously transmit incremental changes in the 3D model (anatomy, instruments, pointers, and annotation) between Canberra and Austin keeping all movable components, as well as the users' instruments, synchronized with each other. Both participants can simultaneously grasp pliable body organs, cut tissue, clip and cut ducts, and at the same time feel the actions and forces provided by each other across the Pacific.  The instructor can grasp the student's tool, and guide it to the correct part of the anatomy, helping them to grip and extend the attached ducts to apply the required tension for clipping.  It is possible for each site to independently zoom and pan the viewpoint, as well as to lock the views together to jointly study the scene.

Both participants are able to draw three-dimensional annotation in the virtual scene while discussing the anatomy, as well as draw diagrams on a virtual white board and annotate a virtual medical scan viewer.  This permits detailed discussion about the techniques required in the gall bladder removal operation.  Each is able to point and sketch questions and answers, adding to the flow of information between instructor and student.

A virtual video player embedded in a separate part of the scene, allows the participants to remain immersed in the virtual environment while they view a pre-recorded video of real surgery. Each participant can pause the video and draw on the virtual screen while discussing the operation.  The virtual video players at each end of the network connection are synchronized so that each participant sees the same video frames.  This video feature helps to bridge the gap between the diagrammatic, abstract presentation of the surgical procedure delivered using the virtual anatomical models and the reality of actual surgery.  Its role parallels the blend of streaming surgical video, static anatomical images and off-line discussion that was presented at the California Orthopaedic Research Network (CORN) demonstration at the Fall 2002 Internet2 Member Meeting (Dev et al, 2004).

Role of Internet2:
Internet2 advanced networks provide the low latency for haptic interaction, low latency to keep dynamic models synchronized at both sites, and high bandwidth for high definition videoconferencing that are required by this application.

click here for videos of previous Virtual Surgery Master Class demos...

 


H.323 and SIP Interoperability

http://www.polycom.com/partners/1,1438,pw-15-86,00.html

Developed by:
Polycom
Microsoft

Demonstrators:
Russ Colbert
Steven Zabriski
James Haferd

Contact:
Phil Marechal
phil.marechal@polycom.com
(408) 474-2710

Partner:
Microsoft RTC Group

Description:
Polycom will demonstrate the integration between Live Communications Server (LCS), Windows Messenger, and Polycom video, voice and multipoint devices. The demonstration includes:

  • Status integration on the Polycom IP600 SIP phone with LCS
  • SIP and H.323 interoperability on the Polycom multipoint bridge (MGC)
  • Ad-hoc and meeting room integration into the Windows Messenger Contact List
  • Using WebOffice portal integration with Windows Messenger to initiate conferences and have all contacts and their video cameras seamlessly connected to it.

The demonstration will also include Windows Messenger client integration of Conference Organizer, Conference Preferences, and Invite to Conference software enhancements inside Windows Messenger.

Role of Internet2:
Polycom and Microsoft have partnered to provide the education community with high-quality video and audio devices—in conjunction with presence and instant message technology—for rich media solutions. Providing these solutions across Internet2 advanced networks will enhance the delivery and quality of distance education applications.


Internet2 Commons Videoconferencing and Collaboration Tools

http://commons.internet2.edu/

Developed by:
Internet2 Commons & Partners

Demonstrator:
Jonathan Tyman

Contact:
Jonathan Tyman
tyman@internet2.edu
(734) 352-7099

Partners:
OARnet, Polycom, RADVISION, First Virtual Corporation, Wave Three Software, VCON, VRVS, Access Grid, inSORS, LoCI, and Marratech

Description:
The Internet2 Commons will demonstrate the many different tools that researchers and educators use for engaging in collaborations over advanced networks. The Internet2 Commons and its partners will preview a proposed “hosting environment” for near production-ready applications which will drive adoption of appropriate technologies while promoting interoperable development. These technologies offer full-spectrum, real-time communications—from presence, chat, voice, and video—to sharing of presentations, large data sets, and computer simulations through a variety of channels and, ultimately, the one that fits your requirements and capabilities best.

Role of Internet2:
Real-time video is the coal miner’s canary for the network, in that it only works when the network environment is healthy. Internet2 advanced networks provide the bandwidth necessary for large-scale deployment of reliable videoconferencing. Internet2 also provides the credible, neutral vetting necessary for broad integration of federation-wide collaboration tools.


Live 3D Video for Virtual Presence

http://www.vbrick.com/

Developed by:
VBrick Systems

Demonstrators:
Mike Savic
Tony Spearink

Contact:
Mike Savic
mikes@vbrick.com
(203) 303-0101

Partner:
Mystic Aquarium and Institute for Exploration

Description:
Video over networks has been around for some time.  From legacy videoconference systems to high-quality, MPEG-2 distance learning and streaming systems—video has been an important part of Internet2 since its beginning.

But virtually all video to date has been flat, single-dimension. These systems seek to digitally emulate what already exists: conventional television. In this demonstration, VBrick Systems will show live 3D video, transmitted from Mystic Aquarium in Connecticut and from VBrick Systems, to the conference in Austin, Texas.  Live 3D video provides a truly immersive experience, giving the viewer much more information than conventional one-dimensional displays and allowing them to truly experience the remote locations, not just "see it". 

This demonstration does not utilize artificial, computer-generated images, but rather live video displayed on a large projection screen in full 30 frames-per-second and with high-quality, stereo audio. This live 3D demonstration will provide high definition quality video and will use VBrick Systems MPEG-2 appliances to deliver the video via IP multicast over Internet2 advanced networks.

Role of Internet2:
Internet2 provides the bandwidth required to transport DVD quality video over vast distances in real-time.  This 3D set-up we are demonstrating can easily be duplicated at any venue that has access to advanced networks.  It is ideal for distance learning where the 3D video enhances the educational process.  Typical applications include science experiments, virtual fieldtrips, and arts performances.


The Logistical Session Layer

http://www.cis.udel.edu/~swany/lsl/index.html

Developed by:
University of Delaware

Demonstrators:
Martin Swany
Aaron Brown

Contact:
Martin Swany
swany@cis.udel.edu
(302) 831-2324

Description:
The Logistical Session Layer (LSL) is a protocol and middleware system for improving performance and functionality in high-bandwidth networks. By utilizing short-term storage "in" the network, end-to-end throughput can be increased. Additionally, LSL enables a variety of new functionality for distributed applications. We will demonstrate the ways in which applications can be made to use this system both as a modification to existing binaries and via small source code changes. The LSL infrastructure is going to be selectively deployed on Internet2's Abilene Network over the coming months.

Role of Internet2:
The Logistical Session Layer is a system that improves the throughput of long distance TCP transfers across advanced networks such as Abilene. It also provides an infrastructure that enables a wide range of emerging advanced functionality, and thus serves the needs of the Internet2 community.


Logistical Networking Rocks Your World

http://loci.cs.utk.edu
http://loci.cs.utk.edu/lodn
http://loci.cs.utk.edu/ibpvo

http://loci.cs.utk.edu/lors

Developed by:
University of Tennessee

Demonstrators:
Terry Moore
Hunter Hagewood

Contact:
Terry Moore
tmoore@cs.utk.edu
(865) 974-5886

Partner:
Rede Nacional de Ensino e Pesquisa (RNP)

Funded by:
National Science Foundation
Department of Energy

Description:
The use of Logistical Networking (LN) technology by the Internet2 community has been growing rapidly for the past year, amounting to almost 1% (3.3TB) of traffic on the Abilene Network during the last week of May 2004. Both end users and application developers are finding that this revolutionary synthesis of shared storage and high speed networking makes it easy for them to get outstanding performance (10s-100s Mbps) for content distribution, advanced multimedia and collaborative applications of all types. Moreover, it does so without sacrificing either flexibility or ease of use. Our live, interactive demonstrations will make the reasons for this enthusiastic user response evident.  The LN tools and applications to be shown include the following:

LoDN — The Logistical Distribution Network (LoDN, or “low down”) is a content distribution service that allows Internet2 users to store, publish, and access content at high performance on the global LN infrastructure using a Web-based directory interface and simple java enabled tools. Currently offered as a service by University of Tennessee's LoCI Lab, LoDN is already in daily use on Internet2 for the high speed delivery of hundreds of gigabytes of Linux ISOs and large scientific data files at high performance.  When the LoDN server software is published later in 2004, other individuals and groups will be able to set up LoDN services of their own, leveraging the same LN infrastructure and the same auto-installing Java client to serve their users.

IBPvo — Personal video recording meets Internet2 in this experimental application. IBPvo shows how LN technology, which is based on the Internet Backplane Protocol (IBP), can be used for the recording and flexible delivery of video content. Obvious application areas within the Internet2 community include distance education and telemedicine, especially in the wide area or to large, highly distributed communities. LN technology is being used for educational video distribution across a large number of sites on the Brazilian research network, Rede Nacional de Pesquisa (RNP), for example.

LoRS — The Logistical Runtime System (LoRS) is a suite of software tools for more sophisticated users, content publishers, and developers.  It provides more fine grained control over the use of the LN infrastructure, supports the detailed visualization of how content is distributed, supports sophisticated end-to-end services, such as automatic data compression/decompression and error encoding for more efficient fault tolerance, and comes with a complete API that allows application developers to exploit the full range of power of LN technology.

Role of Internet2:
LN infrastructure is distributed across Internet2 institutions, at several sites closely connected to the backbone, and on high performance research networks world wide. There are currently 359 public IBP servers in 25 countries and 32 American states, with 30+TB of storage available for use.  The main beneficiaries of LN technology are Internet2 users and application communities, because it enables them to easily get the 10s-100s Mbps out of their high speed network connections.


MusicPath — Interconnecting Pianos in Real Time

MusicPath demos take place outside of the Governor's Ballroom on:

Monday, September 27, 5:45 - 6:15pm
Tuesday, September 28, 12:30 - 1:00pm
Wednesday, September 29, 12:30 - 1:00pm

http://musicpath.acadiau.ca

Developed by:
Acadia University

Demonstrators:
Lucas Porter (at Acadia University in Nova Scotia, Canada)
Karen Wilder
Jim Diamond

Contact:
Karen Wilder
karen.wilder@acadiau.ca
(902) 585-1043

Remote Partner in Testing:
The Royal Conservatory of Music, Toronto

Funded by:
CANARIE, Inc.
Acadia University
The Royal Conservatory of Music
Yamaha Canada Music, Ltd.

Description:
The MusicPath software, created at Acadia University, has enabled the connection of digital acoustic pianos over IP.  While previous projects have successfully used videoconferencing for music, this project actually enables the remote piano keys and pedals to be controlled from a distance. Piano pedagogues listen to the true acoustic performance, not amplified sound. Since the fall of 2003, a 12 year old piano prodigy in remote Nova Scotia has been receiving lessons from a piano pedagogue in metro Toronto.  In addition, some music examinations and interactive classes have been conducted over this IP connection.

Media interest in MusicPath continues. Both TechTV and the New York Times have been excited by the live demonstrations. Oscar Peterson, internationally renowned Jazz pianist, calls MusicPath a "breakthrough in music." MusicPath was developed at Acadia University by Jim Diamond and Christoph Both; Karen Wilder is MusicPath Project Manager.

Role of Internet2:
The Canadian CA*net4 high speed network enabled the MusicPath research and the subsequent music lessons.  Without the software and the IP network, the lessons could only be conducted by travelling from rural Nova Scotia to metro Toronto by car and plane. Because of the interconnection of Internet2 and CA*net4, we are now free to conduct music lessons or give piano performances between any locations where the network travels.


NLANR Network Performance Advisor

http://dast.nlanr.net/Projects/Advisor/

Developed by:
National Laboratory for Applied Network Research (NLANR)

Demonstrators:
Tanya Brethour
Jim Ferguson

Contact:
Tanya Brethour
brethour@ncsa.uiuc.edu
(217) 333-3019

Funded by:
National Science Foundation

Description:
Tools to enhance network performance are not a novel concept, yet many users still struggle to achieve the full potential of their networks. While consulting the advice of a network engineer is the ideal solution, it is not always a possibility. Therefore, users can now consult "the Advisor." Developed by the NLANR Distributed Applications Support Team, the Advisor is a simple, yet sophisticated, open source application that measures, displays, and analyzes network metrics. It uses existing diagnostic tools such as ping, traceroute, Iperf, and Web100 and integrates them into a common framework. This framework attempts to emulate a networking expert, and allows users to troubleshoot their own networking problems. Additional tools and analyses are simple to add. Additionally, the Advisor is well designed in that specific components that expose performance data may be separated, and customized, or integrated into other applications. The Network Performance Advisor has advanced significantly over the last year and now includes a stable Performance Data Collector that utilizes the Global Grid Forum Network Measurement Schema, a more intelligent Analysis Engine, a Historical Data Archiver, and improved GUI. Attendees at this demo will see all components in action as we run controlled performance tests between the demo location and other remote locations.

Role of Internet2:
Over the last few years, the NLANR/DAST Advisor project has worked closely with the Internet2 End-to-End Performance Initiative Performance Environment System (piPEs) project. Both projects are active participants in the GGF Network Measurement Working Group, which is responsible for the Network Measurement XML schemas. Using a common schema to represent network metrics, the two frameworks can easily share measurement data. Therefore, the Advisor is capable of utilizing and displaying data collected by piPEs. We plan to make use of the Internet2 piPEs data in our analysis of the end-to-end path.


SPOCP — A General Authorization Service

http://www.spocp.org/

Developed by:
Karolinska Institute
Lund University
Stockholm University
Umeå University
Uppsala University
Uninett

Demonstrators:
Roland Hedberg
Torbjörn Wiberg

Contact:
Roland Hedberg
roland.hedberg@adm.umu.se
+46 70 520 4203

Description:
SPOCP (Simple Policy Control Project) is a cooperative project whose task is to provide the partners with software for authorization services. The partners are five Swedish universities (Karolinska Institute, Lund University, Stockholm University, Umeå University and Uppsala University) and UNINETT, the Norwegian National Research Network. The SPOCP project will demonstrate how the generalized authorization server SPOCP can be used to handle authorization for intra- as well as Internet-based applications. Our demonstration will include access control for applications like:

  • SMTP server (postfix)
  • Web server (Apache)
  • LDAP server (OpenLDAP)
SPOCP is developing an authorization framework, consisting of a server, client libraries in several programming languages and administrative tools that will allow an organization to manage its access policy in a more homogenous manner.

Role of Internet2:
Internet2 is very active in the middleware arena. SPOCP can provide one of the pieces of the puzzle alongside with the enterprises' directory and the authentication service.


Technology and Policy Solutions for an Inter-Institutional Grid

http://www.nsf-middleware.org/testbed

Developed by:
NMI Integration Testbed Participants

Demonstrators:
Art Vandenberg, Georgia State University
Jim Jokl, University of Virginia
Pravin Joshi, University of Alabama at Birmingham
John-Paul Robinson, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Sandra Redman, University of Alabama in Huntsville
Shawn McKee, University of Michigan
Ashok Adiga, University of Texas at Austin

Contact:
Mary Fran Yafchak
maryfran@sura.org
(315) 593-0718

Funded by:
National Science Foundation award ANI-0123937

Description:
In the final year of its cooperative agreement, the NMI Integration Testbed Program is further formalizing its evaluation of NMI Grid components and related integrating enterprise middleware. This will be accomplished by building an NMI Testbed GRID and related investigative activities to achieve the following broad objectives:

  • Provide a mechanism for testbed sites to explore grid capability with researchers and faculty.
  • Identify, address, and resolve unaddressed cross-campus authentication for inter-institutional grids.
  • Expand evaluation and real life usage of NMI components related to campus enterprise infrastructure.
  • Provide NMI Sites with a foundation from which to propose and secure funding for additional development.

The demonstration will include using local credentials (UMich using its enterprise Kerberos; UAB using its enterprise BlazerID) linked to campus enterprise CA certificates to access grid based resources. A NMI Testbed Grid BridgeCA (hosted at UVA, with UAB, TACC and others cross certified) will allow the use of local authoritative enterprise credentials to access grid resources external to the local campus. Sites will demonstrate several NMI Testbed Grid portals, based on OGCE and Ganglia, as a way to view resources, submit jobs, monitor activity, and retrieve results. A bioinformatics application for genome sequence alignment (developed at GSU and tested on UAB grid resources) will demonstrate using grid middleware tools to provide improved performance for genome alignment. Grid-enabled applications in production at UAH & TACC will also be demonstrated.

The interoperation of these various resources and components will demonstrate the technical solutions needed for grid-based resources and grid-enabled applications, as well as serving to highlight some of the policy issues that must be considered.

Role of Internet2:
The NSF cooperative agreement, under which this work is funded, is a partnership between Internet2, EDUCAUSE and SURA. The Internet2 Middleware Initiative has also been instrumental in influencing this work through the fostering middleware investigations and establishing standards-based, open solutions for inter-organizational collaboration and research computing.

 

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